Keywords
Pediatrics ×
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Table of contents
  1. 1. Clinical Trial
  2. 2. Routine Documentation
  3. 3. Registry/Cohort Study
  4. 4. Quality Assurance
  5. 5. Data Standard
  6. 6. Patient-Reported Outcome
  7. 7. Medical Specialty
Selected data models

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- 4/13/21 - 16 forms, 13 itemgroups, 77 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: Current examination, Cardiologic Examination, Laboratory results, Tumor marker, Surrogate endpoint, Quality of life, Diagnostic Imaging, MRT / CT findings, Local MRT/ CT assessment, MIBG scintiscan, Bone Marrow Examination, Other examination, General assessment
- 3/15/21 - 1 form, 6 itemgroups, 31 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: Patient Information, Eligibility Criteria, Steroid therapy and chemotherapy regimen, Concomitant studies and storage of clinical samples, Laboratory Diagnostic, Identification and Signature
- 9/29/20 - 1 form, 5 itemgroups, 36 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: General Information, Instructions, child, child, child
Waschbusch, D. A., Sparkes, S. J., & Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services. (2003). Assessment of Disruptive Symptoms: DSM-IV Version - For Teachers (ASD-IV-T). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 27.09.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Waschbusch, D. A., Sparkes, S. J., & Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services. (2003). Rating Scale Assessment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD): Is there a Normal Distribution and Does it Matter? Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 21(261). DOI: 10.1177/073428290302100303 Primary use / Purpose: The Assessment of disruptive Symptoms-DSM-IV Version - For Teachers (ASD-IV-T) is a Likert scale developed to measure symptoms of Conduct Disorder (CD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). The ASD-IV-T, rather than giving simple yes/no diagnoses, can also measure the severity of the given disorder. Background: The Assessment of disruptive Symptoms-DSM-IV Version - For Teachers (ASD-IV-T) is designed to measure the level (i.e low, average, high) of disorders including Conduct Disorder (CD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). This sets it apart from scales which are only capable of making binary diagnoses. This scales ability to demarcate individuals with unusually low levels of characteristics belonging to these disorders -as opposed to high- is unique and has potential for varied usage. Psychometrics: The psychometric properties of the Assessment of disruptive Symptoms-DSM-IV Version - For Parents (ASD-IV-P) are discussed in Waschbusch, D. A., Sparkes, S. J., & Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services. (2003). Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.304
- 9/28/20 - 1 form, 8 itemgroups, 45 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: General Information, Instructions, past six months child, behaviors causing problem at, past six months child, behaviors causing problem at, past six months child, behaviors causing problem at
Waschbusch, D. A., Sparkes, S. J., & Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services. (2003). Assessment of Disruptive Symptoms: DSM-IV Parent Version. Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 27.09.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Waschbusch, D. A., Sparkes, S. J., & Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services. (2003). Rating Scale Assessment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD): Is there a Normal Distribution and Does it Matter? Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 21(261). DOI: 10.1177/073428290302100303 Primary use / Purpose: The Assessment of disruptive Symptoms-DSM-IV Version - For Parents (ASD-IV-P) is a Likert scale developed to measure symptoms of Conduct Disorder (CD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). The ASD-IV-P, Rather than giving simple yes/no diagnoses, can also measure the severity of the given disorder. Background: The Assessment of disruptive Symptoms-DSM-IV Version - For Parents (ASD-IV-P) is designed to measure the level (i.e low, average, high) of disorders including Conduct Disorder (CD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). This sets it apart from scales which are only capable of making binary diagnoses. This scales ability to demarcate individuals with unusually low levels of characteristics belonging to these disorders -as opposed to high- is unique and has potential for varied usage. Psychometrics: The psychometric properties of the Assessment of disruptive Symptoms-DSM-IV Version - For Parents (ASD-IV-P) are discussed in Waschbusch, D. A., Sparkes, S. J., & Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services. (2003). Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.303
- 9/22/20 - 1 form, 3 itemgroups, 20 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: General Information, Instructions, past year child
Waschbusch, D. A., Elgar, F. J. (2007). Conduct Disorder Rating Scale - Teacher Version. Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 22.09.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Waschbusch, D. A., & Elgar, F. J. (2007). Development and validation of the conduct disorder rating scale. Assessment, 14, 65-74. Fabiana. G. A, Pelham, W. E., Waschbusch, D. A., Gnagy, E. M., Lahey, B. B., et al. (2006). A Practical Measure of Impairment: Psychometric Properties of the Impairment Rating Scale in Samples of Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Two School-Based Samples. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 35(3), 369–385. Primary use / Purpose: The purpose of the Conduct Disorder Rating Scale- For Teachers (CDRS-T) is to allow for measurement of conduct disorder (CD). The CDRS-T is a Likert-type scale with scores ranging from 1-4 which measures CD in line with current conceptualizations as described in the DSM-IV. The twelve symptom used in the scale are taken directly form the DSM-IV definition of CD. Three symptoms which are present in the Conduct Disorder Rating Scale- for parents (CDRS-P) are omitted from the current scale because they do not occur in schools. Background: It is considered a public health priority to effectively manage the troublesome behaviour of disorderly adolescents and children. Conduct disorder (CD) is estimated to affect up to 5% of children between the ages of four and sixteen and is often linked to drug abuse, violence, and sexual victimization. Therefore it is important to have reliable and consistent measures of CD. However, many existing scales measure CD is ways which are not wholly consistent with the criteria set out in the DSM-IV. To address this shortcoming Waschbusch & Elgar (2007) developed the Conduct Disorder Rating Scale- for teachers (CDRS-T). Psychometrics: The psychometric properties of the Conduct Disorder Rating Scale- for parents (CDRS-T) are discussed in Waschbusch & Elgar, (2007). Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.302
- 9/22/20 - 1 form, 4 itemgroups, 26 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: General Information, Instructions, past year child, impact daily life
Waschbusch, D. A., Elgar, F. J. (2007). Conduct Disorder Rating Scale - Parent Version. Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 22.09.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Waschbusch, D. A., & Elgar, F. J. (2007). Development and validation of the conduct disorder rating scale. Assessment, 14, 65-74. Fabiana. G. A, Pelham, W. E., Waschbusch, D. A., Gnagy, E. M., Lahey, B. B., et al. (2006). A Practical Measure of Impairment: Psychometric Properties of the Impairment Rating Scale in Samples of Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Two School-Based Samples. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 35(3), 369–385. Primary use / Purpose: The purpose of the Conduct Disorder Rating Scale- For Parents (CDRS-P) is to allow for measurement of conduct disorder (CD). The CDRS-P is a Likert-type scale with scores ranging from 1-4 which measures CD in line with current conceptualizations as described in the DSM-IV. The fifteen symptom used in the scale are taken directly form the DSM-IV definition of CD. Background: It is considered a public health priority to effectively manage the troublesome behaviour of disorderly adolescents and children. Conduct disorder (CD) is estimated to affect up to 5% of children between the ages of four and sixteen and is often linked to drug abuse, violence, and sexual victimization. Therefore it is important to have reliable and consistent measures of CD. However, many existing scales measure CD is ways which are not wholly consistent with the criteria set out in the DSM-IV. To address this shortcoming Waschbusch & Elgar (2007) developed the Conduct Disorder Rating Scale- for parents (CDRS-P). Psychometrics: The psychometric properties of the Conduct Disorder Rating Scale- for parents (CDRS-P) are discussed in Waschbusch & Elgar, (2007). Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.301
- 8/18/20 - 1 form, 3 itemgroups, 56 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: General Information Section, Childhood Autism Sydrome Test (CAST), Special Needs Section
- 8/16/20 - 1 form, 1 itemgroup, 25 items, 1 language
Itemgroup: Quantitative Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (Q-CHAT)
Allison, C., Baron-Cohen, S. Wheelwright, S., Charman, T., Richler, J., Pasco, G. and Brayne, C.. (2008). Quantitative Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (Q-CHAT). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 16.08.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Allison, C., Baron-Cohen, S. Wheelwright, S., Charman, T., Richler, J., Pasco, G. and Brayne, C. (2008). The Q-CHAT (Quantitative CHecklist for Autism in Toddlers): A Normally Distributed Quantitative Measure of Autistic Traits at 18-24 Months of Age: Preliminary Report. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders Allison, C. Auyeung, B., Baron-Cohen, S. (2012) Toward Brief "Red Flags" for Autism Screening: The Short Autism Spectrum Quotient and the Short Quantitative Checklist in 1,000 Cases and 3,000 Controls Journal of the American Acad of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Primary use / Purpose: The Q-CHAT allows early detection of autism spectrum disorders, at 18-24 months of age. It is a quick measure containing 25 likert-type items describing behaviours a child may or may not engage in. Background: The Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (CHAT) was developed in 2001 to allow health professionals to "red flag" a case for further diagnostic assesment. The Q-CHAT is a modified version which can be completed by a parent and also has higher sensitivity. It includes additional items on language development, social communication and repetitive behaviours. Psychometrics: Psychometrics are discussed in Allison, Auyeung, and Baron-Cohen (2012). Web link to tool and scoring: https://www.autismresearchcentre.com/arc_tests/ Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.180
- 8/15/20 - 1 form, 3 itemgroups, 20 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: General Information, SECTION A: ASK PARENT:, SECTION B: GP OR HV OBSERVATION: