Keywords
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Table of contents
  1. 1. Clinical Trial
  2. 2. Routine Documentation
  3. 3. Registry/Cohort Study
  4. 4. Quality Assurance
  5. 5. Data Standard
  6. 6. Patient-Reported Outcome
  7. 7. Medical Specialty
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- 9/29/20 - 1 form, 5 itemgroups, 36 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: General Information, Instructions, child, child, child
Waschbusch, D. A., Sparkes, S. J., & Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services. (2003). Assessment of Disruptive Symptoms: DSM-IV Version - For Teachers (ASD-IV-T). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 27.09.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Waschbusch, D. A., Sparkes, S. J., & Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services. (2003). Rating Scale Assessment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD): Is there a Normal Distribution and Does it Matter? Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 21(261). DOI: 10.1177/073428290302100303 Primary use / Purpose: The Assessment of disruptive Symptoms-DSM-IV Version - For Teachers (ASD-IV-T) is a Likert scale developed to measure symptoms of Conduct Disorder (CD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). The ASD-IV-T, rather than giving simple yes/no diagnoses, can also measure the severity of the given disorder. Background: The Assessment of disruptive Symptoms-DSM-IV Version - For Teachers (ASD-IV-T) is designed to measure the level (i.e low, average, high) of disorders including Conduct Disorder (CD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). This sets it apart from scales which are only capable of making binary diagnoses. This scales ability to demarcate individuals with unusually low levels of characteristics belonging to these disorders -as opposed to high- is unique and has potential for varied usage. Psychometrics: The psychometric properties of the Assessment of disruptive Symptoms-DSM-IV Version - For Parents (ASD-IV-P) are discussed in Waschbusch, D. A., Sparkes, S. J., & Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services. (2003). Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.304
- 9/28/20 - 1 form, 8 itemgroups, 45 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: General Information, Instructions, past six months child, behaviors causing problem at, past six months child, behaviors causing problem at, past six months child, behaviors causing problem at
Waschbusch, D. A., Sparkes, S. J., & Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services. (2003). Assessment of Disruptive Symptoms: DSM-IV Parent Version. Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 27.09.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Waschbusch, D. A., Sparkes, S. J., & Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services. (2003). Rating Scale Assessment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD): Is there a Normal Distribution and Does it Matter? Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 21(261). DOI: 10.1177/073428290302100303 Primary use / Purpose: The Assessment of disruptive Symptoms-DSM-IV Version - For Parents (ASD-IV-P) is a Likert scale developed to measure symptoms of Conduct Disorder (CD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). The ASD-IV-P, Rather than giving simple yes/no diagnoses, can also measure the severity of the given disorder. Background: The Assessment of disruptive Symptoms-DSM-IV Version - For Parents (ASD-IV-P) is designed to measure the level (i.e low, average, high) of disorders including Conduct Disorder (CD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). This sets it apart from scales which are only capable of making binary diagnoses. This scales ability to demarcate individuals with unusually low levels of characteristics belonging to these disorders -as opposed to high- is unique and has potential for varied usage. Psychometrics: The psychometric properties of the Assessment of disruptive Symptoms-DSM-IV Version - For Parents (ASD-IV-P) are discussed in Waschbusch, D. A., Sparkes, S. J., & Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services. (2003). Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.303
- 9/22/20 - 1 form, 3 itemgroups, 20 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: General Information, Instructions, past year child
Waschbusch, D. A., Elgar, F. J. (2007). Conduct Disorder Rating Scale - Teacher Version. Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 22.09.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Waschbusch, D. A., & Elgar, F. J. (2007). Development and validation of the conduct disorder rating scale. Assessment, 14, 65-74. Fabiana. G. A, Pelham, W. E., Waschbusch, D. A., Gnagy, E. M., Lahey, B. B., et al. (2006). A Practical Measure of Impairment: Psychometric Properties of the Impairment Rating Scale in Samples of Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Two School-Based Samples. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 35(3), 369–385. Primary use / Purpose: The purpose of the Conduct Disorder Rating Scale- For Teachers (CDRS-T) is to allow for measurement of conduct disorder (CD). The CDRS-T is a Likert-type scale with scores ranging from 1-4 which measures CD in line with current conceptualizations as described in the DSM-IV. The twelve symptom used in the scale are taken directly form the DSM-IV definition of CD. Three symptoms which are present in the Conduct Disorder Rating Scale- for parents (CDRS-P) are omitted from the current scale because they do not occur in schools. Background: It is considered a public health priority to effectively manage the troublesome behaviour of disorderly adolescents and children. Conduct disorder (CD) is estimated to affect up to 5% of children between the ages of four and sixteen and is often linked to drug abuse, violence, and sexual victimization. Therefore it is important to have reliable and consistent measures of CD. However, many existing scales measure CD is ways which are not wholly consistent with the criteria set out in the DSM-IV. To address this shortcoming Waschbusch & Elgar (2007) developed the Conduct Disorder Rating Scale- for teachers (CDRS-T). Psychometrics: The psychometric properties of the Conduct Disorder Rating Scale- for parents (CDRS-T) are discussed in Waschbusch & Elgar, (2007). Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.302
- 9/22/20 - 1 form, 4 itemgroups, 26 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: General Information, Instructions, past year child, impact daily life
Waschbusch, D. A., Elgar, F. J. (2007). Conduct Disorder Rating Scale - Parent Version. Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 22.09.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Waschbusch, D. A., & Elgar, F. J. (2007). Development and validation of the conduct disorder rating scale. Assessment, 14, 65-74. Fabiana. G. A, Pelham, W. E., Waschbusch, D. A., Gnagy, E. M., Lahey, B. B., et al. (2006). A Practical Measure of Impairment: Psychometric Properties of the Impairment Rating Scale in Samples of Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Two School-Based Samples. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 35(3), 369–385. Primary use / Purpose: The purpose of the Conduct Disorder Rating Scale- For Parents (CDRS-P) is to allow for measurement of conduct disorder (CD). The CDRS-P is a Likert-type scale with scores ranging from 1-4 which measures CD in line with current conceptualizations as described in the DSM-IV. The fifteen symptom used in the scale are taken directly form the DSM-IV definition of CD. Background: It is considered a public health priority to effectively manage the troublesome behaviour of disorderly adolescents and children. Conduct disorder (CD) is estimated to affect up to 5% of children between the ages of four and sixteen and is often linked to drug abuse, violence, and sexual victimization. Therefore it is important to have reliable and consistent measures of CD. However, many existing scales measure CD is ways which are not wholly consistent with the criteria set out in the DSM-IV. To address this shortcoming Waschbusch & Elgar (2007) developed the Conduct Disorder Rating Scale- for parents (CDRS-P). Psychometrics: The psychometric properties of the Conduct Disorder Rating Scale- for parents (CDRS-P) are discussed in Waschbusch & Elgar, (2007). Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.301
- 8/18/20 - 1 form, 3 itemgroups, 56 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: General Information Section, Childhood Autism Sydrome Test (CAST), Special Needs Section
- 8/16/20 - 1 form, 1 itemgroup, 25 items, 1 language
Itemgroup: Quantitative Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (Q-CHAT)
Allison, C., Baron-Cohen, S. Wheelwright, S., Charman, T., Richler, J., Pasco, G. and Brayne, C.. (2008). Quantitative Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (Q-CHAT). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 16.08.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Allison, C., Baron-Cohen, S. Wheelwright, S., Charman, T., Richler, J., Pasco, G. and Brayne, C. (2008). The Q-CHAT (Quantitative CHecklist for Autism in Toddlers): A Normally Distributed Quantitative Measure of Autistic Traits at 18-24 Months of Age: Preliminary Report. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders Allison, C. Auyeung, B., Baron-Cohen, S. (2012) Toward Brief "Red Flags" for Autism Screening: The Short Autism Spectrum Quotient and the Short Quantitative Checklist in 1,000 Cases and 3,000 Controls Journal of the American Acad of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Primary use / Purpose: The Q-CHAT allows early detection of autism spectrum disorders, at 18-24 months of age. It is a quick measure containing 25 likert-type items describing behaviours a child may or may not engage in. Background: The Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (CHAT) was developed in 2001 to allow health professionals to "red flag" a case for further diagnostic assesment. The Q-CHAT is a modified version which can be completed by a parent and also has higher sensitivity. It includes additional items on language development, social communication and repetitive behaviours. Psychometrics: Psychometrics are discussed in Allison, Auyeung, and Baron-Cohen (2012). Web link to tool and scoring: https://www.autismresearchcentre.com/arc_tests/ Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.180
- 8/15/20 - 1 form, 3 itemgroups, 20 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: General Information, SECTION A: ASK PARENT:, SECTION B: GP OR HV OBSERVATION:
- 8/15/20 - 1 form, 2 itemgroups, 55 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: General Information, The Autism Spectrum Quotient (Child)
Baron-Cohen, S., Hoekstra, R. A. Knickmeyer, R., Wheelwright, S. (2006). Adolescent Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 15.08.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Baron-Cohen, S., Hoekstra, R. A. Knickmeyer, R. and Wheelwright, S. (2006). The Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) — Adolescent Version. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 36:343-350 Auyeung, B. Baron-Cohen, S., Wheelwright, S. and Allison, C. (2008). The Autism Spectrum Quotient: Children's Version (AQ-Child). Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders Primary use / Purpose: The AQ is designed to measure the degree to which an individual possesses symptoms typical of the autistic spectrum. The adolescent version is for ages 12-15 while the child version is for ages 4-11. Both instruments have 50 likert-type items with responses ranging from "definitely agree" to "definitely disagree". Background: The Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) was developed due to a need for brief self-administered instruments to determine an individual's position on the autism-normality continuum. The adolescent and child versions allow parents or therapists to complete this instrument on their behalf to determine the presence or absence of traits typical of autism. Psychometrics: Psychometrics for the adolescent version are discussed in Baron-Cohen, S., Hoekstra, R. A. Knickmeyer, R. and Wheelwright, S. (2006), and for the child version in Auyeung, B. Baron-Cohen, S., Wheelwright, S. and Allison, C. (2008). Both have shown favourable outcomes on measures of reliability and validity. Web link to tool and scoring: https://www.autismresearchcentre.com/arc_tests/ Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.175
- 7/23/20 - 1 form, 2 itemgroups, 26 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: Part 1, Part 2
Foa, E. B.. (2001). The Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 23.07.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Foa, E.B., Treadwell, K., Johnson, K., & Feeny, N. (2001). Child PTSD symptom scale (CPSS): Validation of a measure for children with PTSD. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 30, 376-384. Gillihan, S.J., Aderka, I.M., Conklin, P.H., Capaldi, S., & Foa, E.B. (In press). The Child PTSD Symptom Scale: Psychometric Properties in a Sample of Female Adolescent Sexual Assault Survivors. American Psychological Association. Primary use / Purpose: The CPSS is used to assess post traumatic stress disorder severity in children between ages 8-18. It consists of 17 items in part 1 and 7 items in part 2. It takes approximately 20 minutes to administer as an interview measure (by a clinician or a therapist) and 10 minutes to complete as a self-report. Background: The Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS) maps on DSM-IV criteria, and yields a PTSD aggregate score as well as scores on the re-experiencing, avoidance and hyperarousal subscales. The CPSS comprises 24-items, 17 of which correspond to the DSM-IV symptoms. In the first section, answers are on a Likert-type scale where 0 is not at all, 1 is once a week or less/once in a while, 2 is 2 to 4 times a week/half the time, and 3 is 5 or more times a week/almost always. In the second part of the questionnaire, respondents are asked about functional impairment, or how much the problems indicated in section one have interfered with specific areas of life. These 7 questions are scored dichotomously as absent (0) or present (1). Scores range from 0 -- 7, with higher scores indicating greater functional impairment. Psychometrics: See original article (Foa et al., 2001) Other Information: Version also available in Spanish. Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.119
- 7/23/20 - 1 form, 2 itemgroups, 16 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: General Information, Stress Ratings
Silva, L. M. T., & Schalock, M.. (2012). Autism Parenting Stress Index (APSI). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 23.07.2020 from www.midss.ie Key references: Silva, L. M. T., & Schalock, M. (2012). Autism parenting stress index: Initial psychometric evidence. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 42, 566-574. Primary use / Purpose: The APSI is a unique measure of parenting stress specific to core and co-morbid symptoms of autism. Background: Stress among parents of children with autism has been found to be particularly high. Core symptoms, as well as co-morbid behavioural and physical problems, have been found to affect parents' stress levels. The APSI was designed for clinical use to identify areas where parents need support with parenting skills, and to assess the effect of intervention on parenting stress. The APSI was developed following many interviews of parents of children with autism. The Items fall into three categories: the core social disability, difficult-to-manage behaviour, and physical issues. Items are rated as being ‘Not stressful’, ‘Sometimes creates stress’, ‘Often creates stress’, ‘Very stressful on a daily basis’, to ‘So stressful that sometimes we feel we cannot cope.’ The APSI indicates how much stress parents are experiencing and what factors are causing this stress. Psychometrics: The overall APSI scale score demonstrates acceptable internal consistency and test–retest stability for parents of children with autism and other developmental disabilities (Silva & Schalock, 2012). Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.97
- 7/21/20 - 1 form, 1 itemgroup, 20 items, 1 language
Itemgroup: Classroom Anxiety Measure
Richmond, V. P.. (2013). Classroom Anxiety Measure. Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 21.07.2020 from www.midss.ie Key references: Richmond, V. P., Wrench, J. S., & Gorham, J.(2001).Communication, affect, and learning in the classroom. Acton, MA: Tapestry Press Primary use / Purpose: This instrument can be used to measure a student's anxiety in the classroom. Background: The Classroom Anxiety Measure (CAM) is based on Richmond's Situational Communication Apprehension Measure developed by McCroskey and Richmond (1982, 1985) to measure state communication apprehension in any context. Psychometrics: You can expect an alpha reliability on this measure of about .90. For more information on psychometric properties of instrument see Richmond, V. P., Wrench, J. S., & Gorham, J.(2001).Communication, affect, and learning in the classroom. Acton, MA: Tapestry Press. Web link to tool: http://www.jamescmccroskey.com/measures/classroom_anxiety.htm Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.502 This instrument can be used to measure a student's anxiety in the classroom. It is based on Richmond's Situational Communication Apprehension Measure. You can expect an alpha reliability on this measure of about .90. SCORING: To compute your scores, add your scores for each item as indicated below: Recode questions 3, 4, 6, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 18, 19 with the following format: 1=5 2=4 3=3 4=2 5=1 After you have recoded the previous questions, add all of the numbers together to get your composite Classroom Anxiety score. Score should be between 20 and 100. Scores of 80 and above indicate high classroom anxiety; Scores of 25 and below indicate low test or evaluation apprehension; Scores between 26 and 79 indicate moderate test or evaluation apprehension.
- 6/25/20 - 1 form, 2 itemgroups, 36 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: Administrative documentation, Child Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (CEBQ)
Wardle, J., Guthrie, C. A., Sanderson, S., & Rapoport, L. (2001). Child Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (CEBQ). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 25.06.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Wardle, J., Guthrie, C. A., Sanderson, S., & Rapoport, L. (2001). Development of the children’s eating behaviour questionnaire. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 42, 963-970. Carnell, S., & Wardle, J. (2007). Measuring behavioural susceptibility to obesity: Validation of the child eating behaviour questionnaire. Appetite, 48, 104-113. Primary use / Purpose: The CEBQ is designed to measure eating styles in young children. Background: Research has suggested that individual differences in several aspects of eating style contribute to the development of weight problems in children and adults. The Child Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (CEBQ) was designed to assess children's eating scale styles. It is a parent-report measure comprised of 35 items, each rated on a five-point likert scale that ranges from never to always. It is made up of eight scales: Food responsiveness, Emotional over-eating, Enjoyment of food, Desire to drink, Satiety responsiveness, Slowness in eating, Emotional under-eating, and Food fussiness. The instrument is ideal for use in research investigating the early precursors of eating disorders or obesity. Psychometrics: The psychometric properties of the instrument have been evaluated by Wardle and colleagues (2001) and Carnell and Wardle (2007). Scoring: see https://www.midss.org/content/child-eating-behaviour-questionnaire-cebq (cited 25.06.2020) Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.271