Keywords
Medical Oncology ×
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Table of contents
  1. 1. Clinical Trial
  2. 2. Routine Documentation
  3. 3. Registry/Cohort Study
  4. 4. Quality Assurance
  5. 5. Data Standard
  6. 6. Patient-Reported Outcome
  7. 7. Medical Specialty
Selected data models

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- 9/30/20 - 1 form, 2 itemgroups, 7 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: General Information, BRIEF EDINBURGH DEPRESSION SCALE
Lloyd-Williams, M., Shiels, C., Dowrick, C. (2006). The Brief Edinburgh Depression Scale (BEDS). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 30.09.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Lloyd-Williams, M., Shiels, C., Dowrick, C. (2007). The development of the Brief Edinburgh Depression Scale (BEDS) to screen for depression in patients with advanced cancer. Journal of Affective Disorders, 99(1-3), 259-264. Primary use / Purpose: The Brief Edinburgh Depression Scale (BEDS) is a 6-item inventory rated on a 4 point Likert-type scale. Its purpose is to briefly and accurately measure depression in those in the advanced stages of cancer. Background: Depression and reduced quality of life have long been recognized as serious problems in the later stages of cancer. These mood states are commonly infered from physical symptoms such as weight loss, loss of appetite, or/and sleep disturbance. However, subjective measures are often ignored. The Brief Edinburgh Depression Scale (BEDS) aims to address this limitation by instead ignoring somatic symptoms, focusing only on subjective feelings of worth and sadness et alia. In its brief form the BEDS also has the advantage of being quick and easy to use which is an important consideration when dealing with terminally ill patients. Psychometrics: The psychometric properties of the Brief Edinburgh Depression Scale (BEDS) are discussed in Lloyd-Williams, Shiels, & Dowrick (2007). Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.328 Scoring: Score of 6/18 is indicative of depression Background: The development of a brief valid tool to screen for depression in patients with advanced cancer is important. This paper reports data on the psychometric properties of the Brief Edinburgh Depression Scale Method: Two hundred and forty six patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria completed the 10 item EDS and Present State Examination. Results: Factor extraction revealed 6 items from the ten item EDS. The most valid cut-off for defining a case, using the PSE diagnosis as the “gold-standard”, was a score of 6 out of 18 on the Brief Edinburgh Depression Scale which gave a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 83% with a PPV of 65.1% and NPV of 87.1%. Conclusions: The six item EDS is a brief and sensitive method of screening for depression in advanced cancer patients - this novel use of the Edinburgh depression scale may have a significant impact on the assessment and thus management of this distressing symptom
- 9/30/20 - 1 form, 2 itemgroups, 19 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: Instructions, Extent
Stiggelbout, A. M., de Haes, J. C., Vree, R. van de Velde, C. J., Bruijninckx, C. M., van Groningen, K., Kievit, J. (1997). Attitude Follow-Up Scale (AFS). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 30.09.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Stiggelbout, A. M., de Haes, J. C., Vree, R. van de Velde, C. J., Bruijninckx, C. M., van Groningen, K., and Kievit, J. (1997). Follow-up of colorectal cancer patients: quality of life and attitudes towards follow-up. Br J Cancer, 75(6), 914–920. Kiebert, G. M., Welvaart, K., Kievit, J. (1993). Psychological effects of routine follow up on cancer patients after surgery. Eur J Surg, 159(11–12), 601–607 Thewes, B., Butow, P., Zachariae, R., Christensen, S., Simard, S & Gotay, C. (2012). Fear of cancer recurrence: a systematic literature review of self-report measures. Psycho-Oncology, 21, 571–587 Primary use / Purpose: The Attitude Follow-Up Scale (AFS) is a 19-item inventory rated on a 4 point Likert-type scale. Its purpose is to measure the attitudes of cancer patients towards follow-up. Patients’ attitudes are measured under four dimensions: communication (with a physician), reassurance, nervous anticipation, and perceived disadvantages of the follow-up process. Background: A substantial amount of research exists on the well-being and quality of life associated with clinical samples, especially those diagnosed with cancer. However, little research has specifically studied the physical and psychological outcomes associated with follow-up procedures between patient and physician. To address this, Stiggelbout, de Haes, & Vree et al. (1997) tweaked an existing scale developed by Kiebert, Welvaart, Kievit (1993) and ended up with the Attitude Follow-Up Scale (AFS). Psychometrics: The psychometric properties of the Attitude Follow-Up Scale (AFS) are discussed in Stiggelbout, de Haes, & Vree et al. (1997). Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.324