- 9/17/21 - 1 form, 5 itemgroups, 63 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: Pre-evaluation questions, When you answer questions in the following pages about “your significant other”, always respond in reference to the specific person you just indicated above., Pain effect on life, Significant other response pain, frequency daily activities
Kerns, R.D., Turk, D.C., & Rudy, T.E. (1985). The West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (WHYMPI/MPI). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 30.08.2020, from www.midss.ie Primary use / Purpose: The West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (WHYMPI/MPI) is designed to provide a brief, psychometrically-sound, and comprehensive assessment of the important components of the chronic pain experience. The instrument is recommended for use as part of behavioral and psychological assessment strategies in the evaluation of chronic pain patients in a clinical or research setting. Background: The West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (WHYMPI/MPI; Kerns, Turk, and Rudy, 1985) is a 52-item, 12-scale inventory that is divided into three parts. Part I includes five scales designed to measure important dimensions of the chronic pain experience including; 1) perceived interference of pain in vocational, social/recreational, and family/marital functioning, 2) support or concern from spouse or significant other, 3) pain severity, 4) perceived life control, and 5) affective distress. Part II assesses patients’ perceptions of the degree to which spouses or significant others display Solicitous, Distracting or Negative responses to their pain behaviors and complaints. Part III assesses patients’ report of the frequency with which they engage in four categories of common everyday activities; Household Chores, Outdoor Work, Activities Away from Home, and Social Activities. In addition to the individual scale scores, a General Activity scale score, obtained from the combination of all four activity scale scores, has been recommended for some purposes (Turk & Rudy, 1990). Patient’s responses to WHYMPI items are made on a 7-point scale. Psychometrics: Kerns, Turk and Rudy (1985) demonstrated that the internal reliability coefficients of all WHYMPI scales range from .70 to .90; the test-retest reliabilities of these scales over a 2-week interval range from .62 to .91. The validity of the WHYMPI has been supported by the results of confirmatory and exploratory factor analytic procedures. The procedures revealed that the WHYMPI scales were significantly correlated with several criterion measures of anxiety, depression, marital satisfaction, pain severity, and health locus of control. Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.256 Compendium: Reference: Kerns, R.D., Turk, D.C., & Rudy, T.E. (1985). The West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (WHYMPI). Pain, 23, 345-356. Language: English Contact Name and Address: Robert D. Kerns, Ph.D. Chief, Psychology Service VA Connecticut HCS, 950 Campbell Avenue West Haven, CT 06516. Copyright: Copyright © 1985, Robert D. Kerns, Dennis C. Turk, and Thomas E. Rudy. 1. Origin: The instrument is original. It is theoretically linked to the cognitive-behavioral conceptualization of chronic pain (Turk et al., 1983) and health assessment (Turk & Kerns, 1985). 2. Purpose: The West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (WHYMPI/MPI) is designed to provide a brief, psychometrically-sound, and comprehensive assessment of the important components of the chronic pain experience. 3. Population: The WHYMPI has been demonstrated to be applicable across a variety of clinical pain conditions including chronic low back pain, temporomandibular disorders, headaches (Turk & Rudy; 1988; 1990), fibromyalgia (Turk et al., 1996), and cancer pain (Turk et al., 1998a). The WHYMPI has been demonstrated to be sensitive to change following rehabilitation (Kerns & Haythornthwaite, 1988; Kerns, Turk, Holzman & Rudy, 1986; Turk et al., 1993; Turk et al., 1998b). Its brevity, validity/reliability, self-report nature and ease of scoring make it ideal for both clinical and research purposes. The WHYMPI has been used cross culturally and has been translated into several languages including Swedish (Bergstrom et al., 1999), Dutch (Lousberg et al., 1999), German (Flor et al., 1990), Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Icelandic, and Japanese. 4. Administration: Rater: The WHYMPI is a self-report questionnaire that may be administered by a qualified therapist or research assistant. Time required: 20 minutes Training: Individuals administering the WHYMPI should have an understanding of the subscales and how they relate to the cognitive-behavioral perspective of pain. Scoring: Hand scored. Part I Interference: (Question 2+3+4+8+9+13+14+17+19)/9 Support: (Question 5+10+15)/3 Pain Severity: (Question 1+7+12)/3 Life-Control: (Question 11+16)/2 Affective Distress: (6-Question 6) +18+20)/3 Part II Negative Responses: (Question 1+4+7+10)/4 Solicitous Responses: (Question 2+5+8+11+13+14)/6 Distracting Responses: (Question 3+6+9+12)/4 Part III Household Chores: (Question 1+5+9+13+17)/5 Outdoor Work: (Question 2+6+10+14+18)/5 Activities Away from Home: (Question 3+7+11+15)/4 Social Activities: (Question 4+8+12+16)/4 General Activity: (Sum of all questions in Part III)/18 *** To account for sporadic missing data, sums should be divided by the number of non-missing items. Any scale with more than 25% of its items missing should be considered missing. 5. Description: The WHYMPI (Kerns, Turk, and Rudy, 1985) is a 52-item, 12-scale inventory that is divided into three parts. Part I includes five scales designed to measure important dimensions of the chronic pain experience including; 1) perceived interference of pain in vocational, social/recreational, and family/marital functioning, 2) support or concern from spouse or significant other, 3) pain severity, 4) perceived life control, and 5) affective distress. Part II assesses patients’ perceptions of the degree to which spouses or significant others display Solicitous, Distracting or Negative responses to their pain behaviors and complaints. Part III assesses patients’ report of the frequency with which they engage in four categories of common everyday activities; Household Chores, Outdoor Work, Activities Away from Home, and Social Activities. In addition to the individual scale scores, a General Activity scale score, obtained from the combination of all four activity scale scores, has been recommended for some purposes (Turk & Rudy, 1990). Patient’s responses to WHYMPI items are made on a 7-point scale. 6. Coverage: The instrument is recommended for use as part of behavioral and psychological assessment strategies in the evaluation of chronic pain patients in a clinical or research setting. 7. Reliability: Kerns, Turk and Rudy (1985) demonstrated that the internal reliability coefficients of all WHYMPI scales range from .70 to .90; the test-retest reliabilities of these scales over a 2-week interval range from .62 to .91. 8. Validity: The validity of the WHYMPI has been supported by the results of confirmatory and exploratory factor analytic procedures. The procedures revealed that the WHYMPI scales were significantly correlated with several criterion measures of anxiety, depression, marital satisfaction, pain severity, and health locus of control 9. Responsiveness: Studies have demonstrated the sensitivity of the WHYMPI to improvements in pain and functioning (Kerns & Haythornthwaite, 1988; Kerns, Turk, Holzman & Rudy, 1986; Turk et al., 1993; Turk et al., 1998b); the ability of several of its scales to discriminate level of depressive symptom severity (Kerns & Haythornthwaite, 1988); the viability of the Pain Severity and Activity scales as brief and reliable measures of pain intensity and adaptive functioning (Holmes & Stevenson, 1990; Rudy, Turk, Kubinski, & Zaki, 1995); and the predictive utility of the Part II scales in the role of social interaction in the maintenance of pain and disability (Kerns, Haythornthwaite, Southwick, & Giller, 1990; Faucet & Levine, 1991). 10. Strengths: The strengths of the WHYMPI are its brevity, ease of administration, demonstrated reliability and validity, face validity and patient acceptance, and demonstrated utility in multiple clinical and research investigations. 11. Weakness: One weakness of the WHYMPI is that the Life-Control subscale is comprised of only two items. 12. Bibliography:
- 1/13/21 - 1 form, 7 itemgroups, 138 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: Pain, Psychosocial assessment, Pain, Psychosocial assessment, Rating scale, Pain, Psychosocial assessment, Economic, Pain, Psychosocial assessment, Social support, Pain, Psychosocial assessment, Activities of Daily Living, Pain, Psychosocial assessment, Emotional support, Pain, Psychosocial assessment, Coping Behavior
Otis-Green, S., & The City of Hope Pain/Palliative Resource Center. (2012) . The Psychosocial Pain Assessment Form (PPAF). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 12.01.2021, from www.midss.ie. Key references: Otis-Green, S. (2006). Psychosocial Pain Assessment Form. In Dow (Ed.), Nursing Care of Women with Cancer. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby, 556-561. Otis-Green, S. (2005). Psychosocial Pain Assessment Form. In Kuebler, Davis, Moore (Eds.), Palliative Practices: An Interdisciplinary Approach. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby, 462-467. Primary use / Purpose: The Psychosocial Pain Assessment Form (PPAF) is a comprehensive assessment form for measuring psychosocial pain. It does so under five domains: economic, social support, activities of daily living, emotional impact, and coping style. Additionally, an assessment of prior history is included to help clinicians focus interventions where sexual abuse or other traumatic memories are present. Background: The psychosocial model of pain is now widely accepted. Pain is no longer treated, or thought of, as a purely physiological condition, but instead, one that is the product of a myriad of both psychological and physiological factors. For this reason, there is a need for instruments which measure the full range of outcomes and causes associated with chronic pain, whether they be psychological, economic, or physiological. The Psychosocial Pain Assessment Form (PPAF) was developed to be used in this capacity. Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.344
- 7/31/20 - 1 form, 22 itemgroups, 324 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: Medical History, Family History, Panic attack in the last year, Panic attack time to maximum, Panic attack duration, Symptoms most recent panic attack, Symptoms worst ever panic attack, Symptoms typical/usual panic attack, worrying about future panic attacks, Symptoms, Fear panic attacks, Further harm, Situational setting of panic attacks 1, Situational setting of panic attacks 2, Avoidance because of fear of having a panic attack, Situation most likely for a panic attack, Control, Impact on life, Predictability, Coping, First panic attack, Were you experiencing any of the following stressful events at the time you had your first panic attack?
- 7/23/20 - 1 form, 2 itemgroups, 26 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: Part 1, Part 2
Foa, E. B.. (2001). The Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 23.07.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Foa, E.B., Treadwell, K., Johnson, K., & Feeny, N. (2001). Child PTSD symptom scale (CPSS): Validation of a measure for children with PTSD. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 30, 376-384. Gillihan, S.J., Aderka, I.M., Conklin, P.H., Capaldi, S., & Foa, E.B. (In press). The Child PTSD Symptom Scale: Psychometric Properties in a Sample of Female Adolescent Sexual Assault Survivors. American Psychological Association. Primary use / Purpose: The CPSS is used to assess post traumatic stress disorder severity in children between ages 8-18. It consists of 17 items in part 1 and 7 items in part 2. It takes approximately 20 minutes to administer as an interview measure (by a clinician or a therapist) and 10 minutes to complete as a self-report. Background: The Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS) maps on DSM-IV criteria, and yields a PTSD aggregate score as well as scores on the re-experiencing, avoidance and hyperarousal subscales. The CPSS comprises 24-items, 17 of which correspond to the DSM-IV symptoms. In the first section, answers are on a Likert-type scale where 0 is not at all, 1 is once a week or less/once in a while, 2 is 2 to 4 times a week/half the time, and 3 is 5 or more times a week/almost always. In the second part of the questionnaire, respondents are asked about functional impairment, or how much the problems indicated in section one have interfered with specific areas of life. These 7 questions are scored dichotomously as absent (0) or present (1). Scores range from 0 -- 7, with higher scores indicating greater functional impairment. Psychometrics: See original article (Foa et al., 2001) Other Information: Version also available in Spanish. Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.119
- 7/22/20 - 1 form, 1 itemgroup, 22 items, 1 language
Itemgroup: Self-Consciousness Scale--(SCS-R)
Scheier, M. F., & Carver, C. S.. (2013). Self-Consciousness Scale--(SCS-R). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 22.07.2020 from www.midss.ie Key references: Martin, A. J., & Debus, R. L. (1999). Alternative factor structure for the Revised Self-Consciousness Scale. Journal of Personality Assessment, 72(2), 266-281 Scheier, M. F., & Carver, C. S. (1985). The Self-Consciousness Scale: A revised version for use with general populations. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 15, 687-699. Primary use / Purpose: A revised measure of public and private self-consciousness Background: Private self-consciousness is a tendency to introspect and examine one's inner self and feelings. Public self-consciousness is an awareness of the self as it is viewed by others. This kind of self-consciousness can result in self-monitoring and social anxiety. Both private and public self-consciousness are viewed as personality traits that are relatively stable over time, but they are not correlated. Just because an individual is high on one dimension doesn't mean that he or she is high on the other. Self-consciousness can strongly influence behaviour. As well as public and private self-consciousness, the Self-Conciousness Scale (SCS-R) measures social anxiety. This revised scale is applicable to more general populations. Psychometrics: The Cronbach's alpha for private self-consciousness was found to be .75, for public self-consciousness it was .84, and for social anxiety .79. These alphas compared favorably to those of the original scale. The test-retest correlation for the private subscale was .76, for the public subscale .74, and for the social anxiety subscale .77. These suggest that the scale possesses reasonable stability over time. Web link to tool: http://www.psy.cmu.edu/people/scheier.html Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.613 Scoring Procedures: 1. Reverse code items 8 and 11. 2. Computing subscales: a) For private Self-Consciousness subscale: Sum items 1, 4, 6, 8, 12, 14, 17, 19 and 21. b) For public Self-Consciousness subscale: Sum items 2, 5, 10, 13, 16, 18 and 20. c) For Social Anxiety subscale: Sum items 3, 7, 9, 11, 15 and 22. Scheier, M. F., & Carver, C. S. (1985). The Self-Consciousness Scale: A revised version for use with general populations. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 15, 687-699.
- 7/22/20 - 1 form, 1 itemgroup, 12 items, 1 language
Itemgroup: Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS)
Leary, M. R.. (2013). Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 22.07.2020 from www.midss.ie Key references: Hart, E. A., Leary, M. R., & Rejeski, W. J. (1989). The measurement of social physique anxiety. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 11, 94-104. Primary use / Purpose: This scale measures social anxiety related to physique. By physique or figure we mean your body’s form and structure; specifically, body fat, muscular tone, and general body proportions. Background: The pressures placed on young men and women to portray an ideal physique are predominant social forces in today’s society. A failure to live up to these standards, whether real or imagined, may induce thoughts and feelings that others are negatively evaluating one’s physique. In this case, social physique anxiety may be experienced (SPA; Hart, Leary, & Rejeski, 1989). Subsequently, individuals who are concerned that others are or may be judging their physiques negatively (i.e., SPA) may feel pressured by society’s ideals to engage in physical activity to enhance their physique and decrease the chances of negative evaluations.The Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS) a 12-item self-report scale developed to assess the degree to which people become anxious when others observe or evaluate their physiques. Psychometrics: The Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS) demonstrated both high internal and test-retest reliability. It also correlated appropriately with concerns regarding others' evaluations and with feelings about one's body. Validity data showed that women who scored high on the SPAS were heavier and had a higher percentage of body fat than those who scored lower. In addition, high scorers reported significantly greater anxiety during a real evaluation of their physiques, further supporting the validity of the scale. Web link to tool: http://people.duke.edu/~leary/scales.html Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.598
- 6/25/20 - 1 form, 2 itemgroups, 34 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: Administrative data, SOCIAL ANXIETY QUESTIONNAIRE FOR ADULTS
Caballo, V. E., Salazar, I. C., Irurtia, M. J., Arias, B., and CISO-A Research Team. (2012) . Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults (SAQ-A30) . Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 25.06.2020 from www.midss.ie Key references: Caballo, V. E., Salazar, I. C., Arias, B., Irurtia, M. J., Calderero, M., & the CISO-A Research Team Spain (2010a). Validation of the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults (SAQ-A30) with Spanish university students: Similarities and differences among degree subjects and regions. Behavioral Psychology/ Psicologia Conductual, 18, 5–34. Caballo, V. E., Salazar, I. C., Irurtia, M. J., Arias, B., Hofmann, S. G., & the CISO-A Research Team (2010b). Measuring social anxiety in 11 countries: Development and validation of the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults. European Journal of Psychological Assessment, 26, 95–107. Caballo, V. E., Salazar, I. C., Irurtia, M. J., Arias, B., Hofmann, S. G. & CISO-A Research Team (2012). The multidimensional nature and multicultural validity of a new measure of social anxiety: the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults. Behavior Therapy, 43, 313-328. Primary use / Purpose: The questionnaire is designed to measure specific and/or generalized social phobia/anxiety in adults (18 years and more) from general and clinical populations. This is very useful for identifying not only people with generalized social phobia but particularly specific social phobia. Background: The Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults (SAQ-A30) was a result of several years of work by the research team in 18 Latin American countries, Spain, and Portugal. It was developed from research with approximately 58,000 general participants and more than 1,000 social phobic patients. Regarding initial item selection, more than 1,000 participants recorded situations over 6 years, generating a pool of more than 10,000 social situations. From these, two pairs of social anxiety experts selected scenarios for initial analysis, excluding those situations that were redundant or were not social in nature (i.e., another person[s] played a role in the situation). This left 2,171 scenarios, which were then grouped together based on substantive similarity, leaving a total of 512 social situations. These situations composed the first version of the SAQ-A and after many statistical analyses and clinical judgments, the final version of the 30-item questionnaire was obtained (SAQ-A30). Psychometrics: The SAQ-A30 contains 30 items conforming a social phobia/anxiety structure of five very solid dimensions (factors), each of them including six items. Each dimension has its own cut-off score as the questionnaire also has as a whole. Data on the questionnaire's internal consistency, construct validity, cut-off scores, invariance, and factor structure have been presented (Caballo et al., 2010a, 2012). Other Information: Each item is answered on a 5-point Likert scale. The higher the score in every dimension the more anxiety the person has in this specific dimension. The sum of all the dimensions is the general score of the questionnaire. The five dimensions are the following: 1) Speaking in public/talking with people in authority, 2) Interactions with the opposite sex, 3) Assertive expression of annoyance, disgust, or displeasure, 4) Criticism and embarrassment, and 5) Interactions with strangers. The original questionnaire plus two control items and the cut-off scores for each factor and for the whole questionnaire are included in the reference below: Caballo, V. E., Salazar, I. C., Irurtia, M. J., Arias, B., Hofmann, S. G. & CISO-A Research Team (2012). The multidimensional nature and multicultural validity of a new measure of social anxiety: the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults. Behavior Therapy, 43, 313-328. The original questionnaire without the control items is included in the following reference: Caballo, V. E., Salazar, I. C., Arias, B., Irurtia, M. J., Calderero, M., & the CISO-A Research Team Spain (2010a). Validation of the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults (SAQ-A30) with Spanish university students: Similarities and differences among degree subjects and regions. Behavioral Psychology/ Psicologia Conductual, 18, 5–34. Initial development and validation of previous versions of the questionnaire can be found in the following reference: Caballo, V. E., Salazar, I. C., Irurtia, M. J., Arias, B., Hofmann, S. G., & the CISO-A Research Team (2010b). Measuring social anxiety in 11 countries: Development and validation of the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults. European Journal of Psychological Assessment, 26, 95–107. P.D.: Although we have tried not to include situations related to the gender of people in the questionnaire, there are three items that include the term “opposite sex”. There was no way to substitute them. We suggest that for people whose sexual tendency is their same gender to substitute “opposite sex” for “preferred gender”. Copyright by Fundacion VECA. The questionnaire can be used for research and clinical purposes without further permission. However it can not be modified, used commercially or published by any means without prior permission from the first author (in the name of Fundacion VECA). Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.223
- 6/11/20 - 1 form, 1 itemgroup, 21 items, 1 language
Itemgroup: CPOD-MV Scale
Goodman, Tully, Connell, Hartman, & Huh. (2011). Children's Perceptions of Others' Depression Scale- Mother Version (CPOD-MV). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 11.06.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Goodman, S. H., Tully, E., Connell, A. M., Hartman, C. L., & Huh, M. (2011). Measuring children’s perceptions of their mother’s depression: The children’s perceptions of others’ depression scale- mother version. Journal of Family Psychology, 25, 163-173 Goodman, S. H. (2007). Depression in mothers. In S. Nolen-Hoeksema, T. D. Cannon, & T. Widiger (Eds.), Annual review of clinical psychology (Vol. 3, pp. 107–135). Palo Alto: Annual Reviews. Primary use / Purpose: The CPOD-MV assesses children's understanding and beliefs about their mother's depression. It is designed for use with adolescents and children over the age of 10. Background: Research has shown that depression in mothers can have an adverse effect on the psychological functioning and development of their children (Goodman, 2007). The Children's Perception of Other's Depression Scale- Mother Version (CPOD-MV) is a 21 item measure that examines children's perceptions of the chronicity, severity, and impairment of their mother's depression. It also assesses whether they feel they are responsible for their mother's depression and whether they feel able to deal with their mother's depression. Scores on the CPOD-MV have been found to be significantly correlated with variables like self-esteem, anxiety, depression, self-reported behavior problems, and attributional styles (Goodman, Tully, Connell, Hartman, & Huh, 2011). Scoring instructions are described in Goodman et al. (2011) Psychometrics: The psychometric properties of the instrument are examined and discussed in Goodman and colleagues (2011). Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.195