Keywords
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Table of contents
  1. 1. Clinical Trial
  2. 2. Routine Documentation
  3. 3. Registry/Cohort Study
  4. 4. Quality Assurance
  5. 5. Data Standard
  6. 6. Patient-Reported Outcome
  7. 7. Medical Specialty
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- 9/17/21 - 1 form, 3 itemgroups, 42 items, 1 language
Itemgroups: General Information, Meteoropathy Questionnaire, Meteoropathy Checklist
Mazza, M., Di Nicola, M., Janiri, L. (2012). Metereopathy Questionnaire (METEO-Q). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 04.09.2020, from www.midss.ie Key references: Mazza, M., Di Nicola, M., Catalano, V., Callea, A., Martinotti, G., Harnic, D., Bruschi, A., Battaglia, C., Janiri, L. (2012). Description and validation of a questionnaire for the detection of meteoropathy and meteorosensitivity: the METEO-Q. Comparative Psychiatry, 53(1), 103-106. Primary use / Purpose: To detect meteoropathy and meteorosensitivity (effects of weather changes) on both healthy and psychiatric individuals Background: The term meteoropathy derives from the Greek ‘meteora’ (things high in the air or celestial phenomena) and ‘pathos’ (illness, suffering, pain), and it is used to indicate every pathological dimension in some way related to weather conditions. This concept is referred to a set of temperature, humidity, barometric pressure and brightness. Meteoropathy can be considered a syndrome: in fact, it is represented by a group of symptoms and pathological reactions that manifest when there is a gradual or sudden change in one or more meteorological factors in a given area. Scientists claimed that middle aged persons, especially women are at greater risk of becoming meteoropathic, but even children are at risk. The most frequent symptoms are represented by an increase in depression, both mental and physical, weakness, hypertension, cephalea, a desire to remain indoors, increased susceptibility to pain in the joints and muscles, difficulty in breathing and a heavy feeling in the stomach. There may also be mood disturbances, irritability and symptoms in the cardiovascular system, such as palpitations or pain in the sternum. These symptoms last for one or two days. They begin to decrease once the weather has changed, but return if the weather changes again. When the changes follow one after another, the symptoms decrease in intensity each time, as a sort of adapting process occurs. There is a quantitative difference between the terms ‘meteorosensitivity’ and ‘meteoropathy’. Meteorosensitive are people biologically susceptible to feel the effect of particular atmospherical events on mind and body; meteoropathic are those individuals who develop a specific illness or a worsening of the existing diseases as a consequence of these climatic changes. The Metereopathy Questionnaire (METEO-Q) is a self-administered questionnaire for the detection of meteoropathy and meteorosensitivity. This is believed to be the first questionnaire designed to measure symptoms of meteoropathy. Psychometrics: The METEO-Q has been formulated to assess the sensitivity to climate changes and their impact on symptomatologic modifications. It consists in 11 items and a structured checklist aiming to identify the physical and psychological symptoms mainly related to climate variations. Items 1-5 quantitatively explore variation of mood related or caused by specific weather conditions (variations of mood in relation to the change of latitude; variations of mood in relation to atmospheric changes; variations of mood in relation to the brightness of the sky; variations of mood caused by the temperature changes; mood changes caused by the seasons changing), while items 6-11 explore qualitative effects of symptoms (degree of relation between symptomatology and the climatic change; tendency of disturbs to minimize or disappear when the triggering condition stops or when an opposite environmental condition comes up; eventual coincidence of these disturbs with other cyclical phenomena; presence of prodromical symptoms; interference with daily activities; uneasiness feelings induced by climatic changes). The checklist explores most frequently experienced disturbs related to climatic, atmospheric, temperature or brightness changes. For each of the 21 symptoms, individuals are asked to rate on the basis of a 5-point Likert scale rating from 0 (absent) to 4 (severe). Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.269
- 9/17/21 - 1 form, 1 itemgroup, 9 items, 1 language
Itemgroup: Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale
Kanter, J. W., Mulick, P. S., Busch, A. M., Berlin, K. S., & Martell, C. R.. (2012). Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS) (Short Form). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 23.07.2020 from www.midss.ie Key references: Kanter, J. W., Mulick, P. S., Busch, A. M., Berlin, K. S., & Martell, C. R. (2007). The Behavioral activation for depression scale (BADS): Psychometric properties and factor structure. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 29, 191-202. Kanter, J. W., Rusch, L. C., Busch, A. M., & Sedivy, S. K. (2009). Validation of the behavioral activation for depression scale (BADS) in a community sample with elevated depressive symptoms. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 31, 36-42. Manos, R. C., Kanter, J. W., & Luo, W. (2011). The behavioral activation scale for depression-short form: Development and validation. Behavior Therapy, 42, 726-739. Primary use / Purpose: The questionnaire is designed to measure changes in avoidance and activation over the course of Behavioral Activation for depression. Background: The Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS) can be used to track changes weekly in the behaviors hypothesized to underlie depression and specifically targeted for change by behavioral activation. It examines changes in the following areas: activation, avoidance/rumination, work/school impairment, and social impairment. The BADS consists of 25 questions, each rated on a seven point scale ranging from 0 (not at all) to 6 (completely). The short-form BADS consists of 9 items rated using the same scale as the long-form. Psychometrics: Data on the scale's internal consistency, construct and predictive validity, and factor structure have been presented (Kanter et al., 2007; Kanter et al., 2009). Positive findings on the psychometric properties of the short-form BADs have also been presented (Manos et al., 2011) Other Information: To score the BADS, items from all scales other than the Activation scale are reverse-coded and then all items are summed. To score the subscales, no items are reverse-coded. This process allows high scores on the total scale and the subscales to be represented by the scale and subscale names. In other words, for the total scale, higher scores represent increased activation, while for the Social Impairment subscale, higher scores represent increased social impairment. Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.109
- 9/17/21 - 1 form, 1 itemgroup, 25 items, 1 language
Itemgroup: Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale
Kanter, J. W., Mulick, P. S., Busch, A. M., Berlin, K. S., & Martell, C. R.. (2012). Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS) (Long Form). Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Science. Retrieved 23.07.2020 from www.midss.ie Key references: Kanter, J. W., Mulick, P. S., Busch, A. M., Berlin, K. S., & Martell, C. R. (2007). The Behavioral activation for depression scale (BADS): Psychometric properties and factor structure. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 29, 191-202. Kanter, J. W., Rusch, L. C., Busch, A. M., & Sedivy, S. K. (2009). Validation of the behavioral activation for depression scale (BADS) in a community sample with elevated depressive symptoms. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 31, 36-42. Manos, R. C., Kanter, J. W., & Luo, W. (2011). The behavioral activation scale for depression-short form: Development and validation. Behavior Therapy, 42, 726-739. Primary use / Purpose: The questionnaire is designed to measure changes in avoidance and activation over the course of Behavioral Activation for depression. Background: The Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS) can be used to track changes weekly in the behaviors hypothesized to underlie depression and specifically targeted for change by behavioral activation. It examines changes in the following areas: activation, avoidance/rumination, work/school impairment, and social impairment. The BADS consists of 25 questions, each rated on a seven point scale ranging from 0 (not at all) to 6 (completely). Psychometrics: Data on the scale's internal consistency, construct and predictive validity, and factor structure have been presented (Kanter et al., 2007; Kanter et al., 2009). Other Information: To score the BADS, items from all scales other than the Activation scale are reverse-coded and then all items are summed. To score the subscales, no items are reverse-coded. This process allows high scores on the total scale and the subscales to be represented by the scale and subscale names. In other words, for the total scale, higher scores represent increased activation, while for the Social Impairment subscale, higher scores represent increased social impairment. Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.109